Ecommerce Coffee Chats: The Importance of a Great Online Store for Peak Season

Ecommerce Coffee Chats: The Importance of a Great Online Store for Peak Season

In the age of online shopping, having a sleek, well-functioning online store is critical to a company’s success. Couple that pressure with the influx of ecommerce sales due to Covid-19 this year, and you’ve got an even greater need for an optimized platform.

That’s where Miva, Inc. comes into play.

In this conversation with Michael Schrader, SVP of Sales & Marketing at Miva, we get into the importance of investing in a robust online store platform. As ecommerce continues to evolve, so do customer expectations and demand. The time is now to make changes to your online store and inventory fulfillment process to stay ahead of the competition and in business.

And what happens when peak season has already started? Listen to Michael’s top tips on how to navigate the peak season 2020 landscape successfully, and learn the benefits a Miva store platform gives sellers who want to focus on managing their business, not managing their technology.

Full Transcript

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Intro to Miva

Kim Wren, Director of Business Development, SkuVault

So, hi. I’m Kim Wren, and I am the Director of Business Development for SkuVault. And I have with us today, Mike Schrader. He is the Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Miva, Inc. Mike, you’ve got some really vast experience in eCommerce and software over the years. I was taking a look at it and man, you are out there. You’ve been in SaaS, Omni-Channel, eCommerce, operations and supply chain. So, I’m really interested to chat with you today and learn a little bit about your experience and what you think is going on right now in eCommerce with the craziness we’re experiencing. So, let’s get right into it. And, I’d like to hear a little bit about what you think about peak season this year and where it’s going and how that’s going to look?

Michael Schrader, SVP of Sales & Marketing, Miva

Well, it’s interesting. And yeah, thanks. That’s the polite way of saying I’ve been doing this for a hell of a long time, but I do have a career that spans pretty much the entire history of technology and supply chain, all the way to post-purchase with eCommerce in the middle. Peak season, there used to be a lot of ramping up for peak season. It’s kind of interesting where we’re at now. But I think peak season is going to be dramatically different this year, because I think we’re in peak season right now, as my good buddy Chris Mathelder at UPS says. At UPS, every day is Black Friday right now. So, I don’t know how there can be much more escalation during the holidays than there is now. With COVID, we’ve seen a spike in online sales that is not a necessity.

Brief Overview on the Covid-19 Impact

Michael

So every day, the volume levels are far surpassed what they normally would be. We’re obviously having a very good year. Our business was strong before COVID, but COVID has brought a sense of urgency to the market that’s really driven a lot of behavioral change and a lot of investment that is overdue and much needed. But just in general, when I look at peak season, I think the big change will be the whole idea of buying online, picking up in stores. I think stores are going to be leveraged to be distribution sites. I had called on Sears a few years back and talked to them about the idea of, with their network of stores, they could compete with Amazon. They have a huge eCommerce business, and they could use all those stores they’re closing as distribution hubs, and really build a very viable competitor to Amazon.

Michael

And they’re still stuck in the 20th century, so they didn’t embrace it. But we’re seeing a ton of behavioral change. One of the things we talk about constantly is how people are surviving despite their websites. And they’re building decent businesses despite the fact that they have bad websites. Well, they’re not surviving anymore. They’re finding themselves overwhelmed with not enough labor to overcome the shortcomings of the platforms that they have right now. So, what it’s done now is we have a lot of deals that went closed, deferred, that have literally come back to us and said, “We wish we would have listened to you last year and invested in our platform then because we’d be in a much better position now.” Because what peak season requires is the ability to be agile. And this is not the time to fix things peak season.

Michael

I also think with peak season, it used to be a time when it kind of shut down a lot of people, especially retail apparel. They’d kind of go into a dark period where they wouldn’t do any kind of development on websites. I see that changing as well because they’re very much in a firefighting mode right now, the businesses that are doing well. There’s some that are doing really well. I would say three quarters of the businesses out there are still flourishing, but there are sectors like high fashion retail that is struggling. But if they intend to make a comeback, they’re going to have to make some changes. So, the biggest change is peak season maybe 365 days a year now. And the sense of urgency to adjust and adapt to that is key right now.

How to Prepare for Peak Season

Kim

Interesting, and interesting comment. Yeah. And peak season 365. Wow. That would be something. And so, you were telling me, and you just touched on it, on people who were not ready, and so they, you were talking about cracks in their systems and in their sites. And is there something they can do to get that fixed now and get ready for what’s going to happen and what’s going to continue to grow?

Michael

Yeah, well, I think that’s what we’re seeing a lot of right now is that our volume has picked up just because people know they need to address these issues. So, the reality of it is is that there’s going to be a certain loss of potential income. And we’re going to be kind of in that polite, I told you so mode because we see so often that people have not made the investment and they’re paying the price. But what we had told them in the past now is coming to fruition. So what they’re having to do is bite the bullet and kind of make the commitment to upgrade and change their platforms. We can do it quickly for people, given their businesses are simple. The more sophisticated sites are going to just take a bit more time. But we have a template architecture and ready things that allow people to get it turned out as quickly as six weeks.

Michael

But a typical project takes three to six months, if you’re looking for a real custom user experience and really build up some nice templates, and do all the data migration that you need to do. So there are short term fixes, but I think a lot of them are just going to have to start down the path of facing the reality that they need to do something and they need to do it now because things aren’t going to get better and people are going to become impatient. And the market is more competitive than it’s ever been. I always say we’re probably in the third generation of eCommerce. And there’s still a lot of really horrible websites out there, but there’s a lot of new entries into the market who are leveraging new technology, working with us to create a better buying experience.

Michael

And I use the example of, I bought a hammock from Overstock.com. Now, they were one of the early dotcoms. They built their own website, mainly a homegrown system there that’s monolithic to say the least. Now, if I didn’t really, really, really want that hammock, I would’ve just exed out because it was a nightmare. The path to purchase was impossible. I’m not sure I really ordered the right thing. It’s just they’re so big that they were doing well despite their systems. Well, if they really want to continue to maintain a competitive position in the marketplace with all these new entries into it, they’re going to have to change. They’re going to have to create a better path to purchase. And really, there’s going to be more and more demand, more and more options. And the online retailers that will survive and thrive are the ones who make the investment.

Michael

And we’re seeing that. In my years in the business, I’ve never seen quite the level of change. When I was in supply chain, if you lost say a WMS deal to another vendor, you wouldn’t even think about calling on that particular client again for five or 10 years. Now, we have people that are going from Magento to Shopify and then eight months later coming to Miva. So, the pace of change is quick. People are willing to walk away from a bad investment to try to create a better online experience. And that’s really where I think that we’re in a really good position because we have a very scalable solution. I could turn it on for a small amount, or I can build very elaborate sites for far less than what our competitors do, but we can scale from brand new to 500 million and online and service all those different categories, and give them the ability to be agile.

Michael

So, when you talk about what do you do for peak season, and now that every day is peak, you want to be in a position where you’re agile. Where you can have an idea on a Monday and put it in play on a Thursday. And most of the platforms we see out there, the Magento, open source solutions are very hard to make changes to, cost-effective, kind of scary. The pure play SaaS like Shopify and BigCommerce are really boxed in and you don’t have the ability to customize. So we think we’re really well positioned because we have this agile platform. So, what you want to be able to do is be in a position that you can be flexible with your business. We had a customer that made a big pivot to, they closed 80 stores and they focused completely on the online.

Michael

And they made a huge pivot to selling hand sanitizer. And because our platform was agile, they were able to make that pivot in a matter of days and generate millions of dollars of revenue. That’s the key to survival in the new era of every day of peak day. So you got to invest in a platform that’s agile, and you’ve got to be willing to make changes on the fly. And I think that a lot of people are hamstrung from that challenge. For instance, somebody builds a site on Salesforce in 2015. If you look at it in 2020, it will look exactly the same. Why? Because it was very hard to make those changes, very expensive. And people don’t want to upset the apple cart. So it’s an interesting time. There’s a bigger sense of urgency than I’ve ever seen before. And it’s one born out of necessity. So, it’s a great time to be in eCommerce business, but there will be winners and losers. And the ones who invest will win and the ones who stand pat will find themselves being passed by, to say the least.

What Makes Miva a Different Ecommerce Platform

Kim

Right. No, I agree. And I’m going to ask you, I’m going to skip around a little bit on some of the stuff we were talking about, but I want to ask you about this. I read your blog post on Miva, I think it was from last December on, “Is it just me, or does everyone seem to hate their ecommerce platform?” And I found it really interesting. I love the points that you brought up. So what I’d like to know is, so Miva it is the holy grail of ecommerce platforms. And I saw that as a quote from one of your customers. I thought that was really cool. What is it that Miva does that’s different that makes it easier for the client to get on there and be that turnkey and be a little different from the BigCommerce, the Shopify, and then the other side of the Magento?

Michael

Exactly. So what happened was, the reason Magento got popular early is they provided a toolkit that allowed people to customize their eCommerce platform to suit their specific requirements. So typically people with more complex business challenges and business processes went to our friends at Magento. But what they quickly found out was that there was a ton of overhead and operating costs to managing it, challenges with security breaches, challenges with hosting, all kinds of things that took this great concept of this really flexible kind of configurable, customizable platform, and really turned it into kind of a nightmare. So the majority of our customers come from Magento because they want something a little different than what they get from Shopify and BigCommerce. So with Shopify and BigCommerce, you have a very boxed-in solution. Whatever basically is on that side of the business or that side of the market, it’s just shopping cards.

Michael

They’re relatively new to the market, meaning they’re less than 20 years old, probably 10-15 years old. So what they come to market with is a minimally viable product that they build up by adding extensions. But you really can’t customize those solutions. So if you look at 10 Shopify, 10 BigCommerce sites, they’ll all look exactly the same. Now, how we become the holy grail is, I like to share the story, I was working for HighJump Software, which was a WMS vendor back in the early 2000s. And they had a dotnet platform that was revolutionary because you could customize it without touching source code. You just play with the process objects. And this was back in a time when WMS projects were $2 million in five years and you got into, it just was a nightmare to build these things up.

Michael

And I used to always say, “This is such a great tool, but there’s nothing under it. There’s nothing there. It’s just a toolkit.” Very powerful toolkit, but nothing under it. And now we start, well, what would happen if I could actually get a feature and function rich platform with that layer that allows you to customize without touching source code? So the story I’ve told a bunch since I came on board is, I met Rick Wilson, who’s our CEO, and we just hit it off. And within short order, I was working here. And I never looked at the platform. I thought, “Well, since it could be sold, I probably could sell it.” And this is a great culture, great senior leadership. And then I started sitting through these demos, and I had this epiphany right out of the gate said, “Oh my gosh, this is a really feature and functionally rich platform. It’s a thousand page user guide with this template layer on top that allows you to do customizations without touching source code.”

Michael

Now there may be another software solution out there that does that. There certainly doesn’t seem to be anybody in our space that does that. But in my almost 30 years, I have never seen that combination. It’s usually one or the other. You get SAP and it’s functionally rich, but man, forget about customizing it. Or you get HighJump, which is easy to customize, but has nothing under it. So when I quickly realized that there were those two pieces in play, I knew that we had something that was radically different from anything else in the marketplace. And then the underpinnings of that is a real nice industry leading API set that allows us to tie into WMS and ERP.

Michael

So, it really was kind of that holy grail. So when people look at us, we always do three circles, and open source on one side, and we’ve got the SaaS on the other side, and then the middle flexible adaptable platform. So we offer people the ability to do things that no other platform allows them to do in that if you have an idea on a Monday, you can have it in production on a Thursday. That is not possible in the SaaS world. And it’s not recommended in the open source world. In the monolithic IBM, Salesforce solutions, you just don’t do it because you can’t. It would take hundreds of thousand dollars to make simple changes. So what we see is people, and they’ve got the build-it-yourself stuff, which creates a whole nother set of issues. And people are spending all their time managing the technology rather than managing their business.

Michael

So what we do is we allow people to be very agile. We’re quite often, as part of our sales process, we will show people customer sites, live customer sites we’ll go to. And I can’t tell you how many times we’ll look at a site that we looked at a week before and we’ll say, “Oh, they changed this.” Now, that just doesn’t happen with any other vendor. And on top of it, every one of our sites looks customized because it is. So it’s a customized differentiation for these vendors, for these eCommerce retailers. And once they see it, the bells go off. And there’s a lot of things that we can do to create a better path to purchase. And I know we probably even can talk about shopping cart abandonment, and I know millions of dollars have been invested in it, but I can tell you all, save your money.

Michael

Shopping cart abandonment happens for one reason, that bad website with a bad path to purchase. So what we do is straight a better path to purchase, and it’s a thing that’s evolving at all times. So I love the, I know that people who sell that shopping cart abandonment are going to be upset with me, but people don’t X off because they don’t want to… I’m not going to a website just to look at stuff. I’m going there because I know I want to buy something. And if I get aggravated, I’ll go somewhere else. And that’s what shopping cart abandonment really is. It’s ironic, but I always wonder if ironic, when you use ironic, it’s always questionable if it’s actually ironic. But I just think it’s interesting how much money is spent on shopping cart abandonment when they could just fix the terrible website.

Michael

So what happened is in my years of traveling and selling and working for other eCommerce companies, it just is real clear that everyone hated the website. So, when I found this holy grail of ecommerce platforms, I thought, “Well, we’re going to differentiate from everybody else and show how we can help businesses really have a competitive advantage.” So it really comes down to that. This is not a static business. It changes constantly, and you have to be able to adapt and adjust. And we do that better than anybody else in the market. Nobody else in the market does it. You build it and you have hope for the best. But it’s an interesting time and place. And maybe there is another platform out there in some market or maybe an ecommerce. I just haven’t seen it. But it’s usually one or the other. Here it is, this is it, take it or leave it, or here’s this toolkit and build it and hope for the best. So we are definitely the holy grail. It’s a very unique position to be in.

Kim

Well, good. I mean, that’s a great place to be. So you just mentioned a couple of companies that I want to ask you about. So you have worked for HighJump and RedPrairie, correct, I believe?

Michael

I have.

Good and Bad WMS Practices

Kim

And so you do have quite a bit of experience with WMS and obviously SkuVault is a WMS, more cloud based. We’re always looking for tips, tricks, ideas.

What are some of the practices and what are some of the bad practices that you’ve seen over the years from people who are in eCommerce and trying to do things? Because at the end of the day, ecommerce is just commerce, and you’re still a warehouse and you’re still trying to get it out there. What makes us ecommerce is that we’ve connected ourselves to companies like Miva and Amazon and eBay, so we can pull those orders in, but we’re still powering a warehouse. What helps those people have good processes out there?

Michael

I think that the revelation that people make with WMS specifically is what happens when you put system directed activities in place. You can only throw so many bodies into a warehouse before you go, “Okay, this isn’t working anymore.” And the idea of going to do one task and coming back, and not leveraging tasks and you’re leaving, is such a big mistake. And the unwillingness sometimes to really attack that supply chain side. I always tell the story of, I did a project with [inaudible 00:18:56]. It was a sporting goods company that’s now out of business. And Steve Belardi, who was running the operations side at that time was always too busy to talk, go to lunch. He was always in the weeds, excuse me, and he was overwhelmed at all times.

Michael

Because it was so busy and he was just trying to throw bodies at it. Well, we came in and implemented our WMS. Suddenly, at my subsequent trips, the warehouse seemed quiet. And I laughed, I go, “It seems quiet out there.” He goes, “Yeah.” I go, But production is up, revenue’s up and everything’s up. Right?” He goes, “Yeah.” He goes, “It’s amazing. You were right. We’re doing so much more with less because we’re making the most of the path through the warehouse.” And at the beginning of my relationship, I couldn’t get him out to lunch. By the end of my relationship, we were out going to lunch and having a couple of beers and hanging out because system directed activities changed it. So, I think people just think they can throw bodies into distribution. By the way, that’s called 3PL. That’s what they do.

Michael

They don’t automate. They just throw bodies and charge you for that. But the idea is that you want to automate your distribution process. And I think quite frankly, even with the challenges that we’ve had in the supply chain, and most of them are really manufacturing related, not supply chain, but I think that the time I spent supply chain with all the distribution networks that we automated, and not the cost of jobs, just you do [inaudible 00:20:21]. You don’t fire people. You just are able to grow the business quicker because you have all the assistant directed activities going on, task and leave and all that good stuff. But I really think a lot of the efficiencies that were gained in the ’90s and into the 2000s really kind of saved us during this time period. Because if this had been the supply chain that I knew 20 years ago, eCommerce would struggle. You wouldn’t be getting the product out of the warehouse. And the thing about the WMS side of the business, you have peak and crash, and you kind of get by. Product stops going out of the warehouse, it seems like everybody notices.

Kim

Customers notice when it doesn’t arrive.

Michael

Exactly. And now the thing, my last job was a post-purchase play, and they made a pivot away to AI, which was a really bad decision because when I look at what’s going on right now, and there’s one vendor out there, they do a poor job. So they’re the biggest ones that do tracking. But just basic tracking functionality, like that hammock I ordered from overstock.com two weeks ago, it’s stuck in a warehouse with no idea when it’s going to show up. They tell me it’s in the warehouse. I believe it’s probably still on a boat from China. But I’ve got no insight at all into where that package is. And hey, all you got to do is tell me, “Listen, we’re waiting for it from China. There’s a manufacturing thing.” Okay. I get it. It’s COVID, all of that, but there’s no information at all. So my overstock.com experience was not a good experience. Those little things that we have options, it was a 300 and some dollar purchase. I suspect my credit card’s been processed.

Kim

You’re paying for it. Right.

Michael

I’ve already paid for it, so tell me where it’s at. So ,that’s the big mistake out there. So if someone, I think from a WMS standpoint, I would really try to, and I’m not a feature function guy, but if I was in WMS space right now, I would definitely build a tracking application into my offering because it used to be, well, it was only two days and tracking was important, but two days is two days. Now when it’s two weeks, I mean, I lose track of what I buy online. I have to keep a list.

Michael

So, there’s a whole big piece. I think what this current situation has exposed is just the lack of communication on the supply chain side. I think eCommerce does a better job of that. But even then, they’re still kind of beholding the information they get. So if you’ve got a website and there’s no information there, it’s just like having to dial into figure out where my package is. There’s 10 minutes in my life I won’t get back. So, they certainly need to work on it on that side. And I think that we’re going to see dramatic changes in the very short term. I think there’s going to be more growth and innovation and evolution in technology in the next couple of years than there were in the past 10. Of course, that’s the way it works anyways.

Ecommerce and the Disruptions of Covid-19: Moving Forward

Michael

But yeah, it’s an interesting time. The new normal is not going to be going to stores anymore. And those stores, a lot of the retailers that are going out of business, they were already well on their way, and this just kind of accelerated things. And now they have to think differently. And the real high end retailers who I spent a career selling to, they started out very innovative and they did a lot of cool things, and then they just rested on their laurels and didn’t do anything. And then they wonder why they’re gone. We could put together a pretty impressive list of major companies that are no longer around. So, interesting times we live in.

Kim

It sure is.

Michael

I feel like I’m on a fast train moving North.

Kim

Yeah. Yeah. It’s definitely interesting, and just seeing where everything’s going to go and where’s it going to land, what’s going to happen? What’s going to happen to manufacturing and supply chain? And any comments on the supply chain disruption? And the labor issues people are going to face this year because due to COVID, we have labor shortages, and some people can’t work and some people do work and some companies don’t have the people they need. How are they going to survive this?

Michael

Yeah, well I think if they could do a do over, they would probably move manufacturing to Mexico instead of China. And they would probably would have cooperated a little bit better between the US and Mexico. Some of the challenges we have are we just have a small amount of people who are here on work visas, and we’ve lost a few because of that. Very important parts of our team. And now we’re kind of in limbo. I don’t know that, from a cost effective standpoint, will manufacturing come back to the US. But I could see it moving to Mexico and be a cost effective thing that we could manage. I always get a kick out of when people tell me, “Well, Apple needs to manufacture their goods in China to be competitive.”

Michael

Well, I don’t know, if you’re charging $800 for a phone, I don’t think there’s much competitive pressure on you to build it for 10 cents. But that’s a bigger issue. I mean, shareholder value has kind of corrupted the American business as we know it, and there’s never enough. But I think that we’ll see some stuff go across border. And when you think about it, with a disruption like this, it’d be a lot easier to just send a couple of trucks down to Mexico and grab the stuff and bring it up. But I think the supply chains are working well, but when manufacturing is disrupted in China, when there’s areas that are as punitive to the US as they are to China that are in place, a lot of problems that could be solved, but will take time and leadership. And I just think that we’re going to have to understand that the idea of getting something in two days is probably history.

Kim

It’s definitely slowing down. I mean, I don’t know about you, but often my Amazon deliveries or my deliveries from, I try to shop from smaller merchants, and they take five or six days, but I’m certainly not going to die if I don’t get that new shirt, or I just ordered some hardware. I was able to wait four days for my hardware to get here. That was okay.

Michael

We’ve become more patient. My vision of the future is a resurgence of the small local merchant, and those small local merchants, creating a cool experience and maybe one or two storefronts, and then tying into an online business that they can really drive. So you don’t have all those stores out there that weigh you down. And I think that the big box, they may survive. But the idea of going to retail outlets where there’s 50 to 100 different stores, I think that that’s going to kind of die in the vine. But I think it’s going to create a great opportunity for small business people. What I do with my money now, I got a new Herman Miller chair here, and I didn’t really need… I had one that was 20 years old, and it was still good, but I thought, “Well, I’m going to go help local business.”

Michael

Because the people want to bet on are local people that I like and I know. And I was talking with her about changing a website a little bit. Maybe we could help her out to expand her business. So I think there’ll be a new revolution where there’ll be the small mom and pop shops. And we get a lot of these guys that come in. We just got somebody today from a meat company back East. So they got a store and they sell a good amount of meat, and they want to go deep into the online business, and great. The only challenge they’ll probably have is keeping up with the production to have enough to fulfill the orders. So I think it’s going to be a change in, I think there may be a lot of positives that come out of this. Behavior will change kind of that sense of entitlement.

Michael

I got to have it now. Well, you can’t have it now. And it’ll be interesting. I think that it will also create some challenges for Amazon because their whole model is get it there quickly. And they have such an overwhelming cost structure when you look at it. We’re a big partner of UPS, and I actually worked for UPS. It wasn’t my first job, but my first job out of high school. I worked for two years for them. And what you have to understand about UPS is they’ve got the best real estate. They’ve been around for 100 plus years. So they’re distributing from inside out, where Amazon comes from outside in, which is always going to be more expensive. So, I don’t think Amazon… Amazon is like Sears used to be.

Michael

And Sears is now going out of business. Amazon has got 40% market share plus. In overall retail landscape for online, it’s still only about 20%. Well, that number has probably changed since we last did our numbers, but there’s a lot of room for small people still to come in and small businesses to come in and have a niche. And I joke with the guys on my team all the time. I say, “Listen, if I wasn’t on the back nine of my career, I would probably just quit this job, buy an eCommerce platform from Miva and go start my own business.” Because the idea that you can start out fulfilling stuff out of the garage and all of a sudden build a $20-30 million business, there’s never been a better time for small business. When I was young and up to it, younger and up to it, it cost millions to start a small business.

Michael

My son has a couple of buddies that started a business out of a college. They were frat buddies at SDSU. They started selling bracelets. They call it Pura Vida bracelets. And they started selling them out of their apartment. Now, they just sold it for $75 million. And they’re 35 years old. So, the future is much brighter. It’s just the big chains who kind of rested on their laurels, who should have gone head first into eCommerce, are now paying the price. I remember going to call on high end retailers early in the eComm days, and that’s not even that long ago, and I was always so stunned to see how little they were doing online. You go to some $2 billion company. You think, “Gosh, they’re probably doing 200 million online.”

Michael

And they’d be like, “Oh, we do about 10 million.” What’s the matter with you guys? What are you thinking? So, I think that I’m still very, very bullish, and this is a very dynamic, resilient economy. We’ll bounce back. But people just have to be a little bit bolder, and they’ll have to, there’s that old saying, “Innovate or die.” And I think it’s never been more apparent than now that you better invest in your eCommerce platform right now. Because I can tell you, we’re really busy with a lot of people investing in it. And if you think your competitors are sitting on their hands, I got news for you. They’re not. So, it’s time to invest and be in a position where you can adapt. As things pivot, you can pivot with them and not be tied to these monolithic, old eCommerce platforms that are so hard to manage.

Michael

We’re talking with a prospect right now, and they’re scared to death of making a change. They’ve got a home grown system. They’ve heard horror stories about a couple other competitors who tried to go down the Magento path and things blew up. They’re very nervous. And I said, “Relax, we’ll take care of you.” But no, it’s an interesting time. We feel very fortunate that we’re in this position right now, as I’m sure you do. Because there’s a lot of people out there who are struggling. But ecommerce and supply chain are keys. And I also think that we’re certainly saving a lot of people’s livelihoods. The second quarter was really a case of helping people, throwing a lifeline to people who were trying to make a pivot to online business and to help people who were already there get better at it. And you feel pretty good about things when you’re actually helping people and making a dollar in the process. But it’s a very challenging but also very inspiring time.

Kim

No, I agree. We’ve always said Main Street employs America, and I think Main Street’s just going to look a little different in the future. Main Street may be running down the main street in your small town, but it’s probably going to have a huge ecommerce presence too.

Michael

Absolutely, it’s the age of the entrepreneur. And it’s never been more obvious than now. It’s a great time to be in business. Like I said, we were already on a really strong, strong growth trajectory before this hit. So we were well positioned when it hit. And this August, which is normally quiet for most eComm companies, we’re busy, very busy. And it’s not like everybody’s going to go, “That online thing, no.” You don’t have to be Nostradamus to predict this. It’s only going to get more intense. I mean, look at BigCommerce. Very average offering. They went public, and it just absolutely blew up. And I wish them well. It definitely helps us as well.

Michael

There’s more and more dependence on this online business and a strong supply chain, and we can see the investment is escalating. And I think the future is pretty bright, not only for us, but for the people who buy our services, buy our platform, use our tools. So, it’s always, when I was in Silicon Valley, everybody always acted like their technology, they were saving lives. I watched the show Silicon Valley, which is so classic because it’s so true. I spent years up there. But right now, I don’t know. I think we are maybe not saving lives but saving livelihoods.

Kim

I agree. I agree.

Michael

It’s a nice place to be in.

Kim Wren

It is, it is. And especially in this time, it’s nice to be able to help people that need the help, and maybe help repair a little bit as we go forward.

Michael

Yep. Absolutely. Absolutely.

Kim

Well, Mike, thank you so much for joining me today. It has been a pleasure speaking to you. I’ve really enjoyed it. And I want to remind everybody to make sure that they check out Miva.com and check out the platform because it’s pretty awesome. And anything else you would like to say before we say goodbye?

Michael

I’d say check out SkuVault too because I never thought you could take a WMS and make it as easy to turn on. We talked before about it. I was like, “Wow, 20 years ago when I was doing this, I never saw a SkuVault option.” So, pretty cool. That was really not considered, what you guys are doing is pretty revolutionary.

Kim

Yeah, it is. It is. Cloud based for it’s pretty cool.

Michael

Yeah, we thought that’ll never happen.

Kim

And yet, here we are.

Michael

Here we are. Exactly. No, but my pleasure. Thanks Kim. It’s always fun to talk, even at the end of a busy day.

Kim

Thanks Mike. I appreciate it.

Michael

I wish all the best to everyone out there. And if you’re interested in talking a little bit more about eCommerce and how we can help you, we’d be happy to talk to you. So, thank you very much. Appreciate the opportunity.

Kim

Thanks. Bye bye.

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